Elizabeth Banks took a stand on sustainable fashion by recycling a 2004 dress on Oscars night. (Photo: Bang ShowBiz)

Elizabeth Banks took a stand on sustainable fashion by recycling a 2004 dress on Oscars night. (Photo: Bang ShowBiz)

Elizabeth Banks wora a Badgley Mischka gown to the annual Vanity Fair Oscars party in Los Angeles that may have been familiar to astute viewers. It was the same gown she wore waaay back in 2004.

Banks was part of one of the newest celebrity trends, recycling expensive gowns for gala events. Was she taking a hint from Duchess Kate Middleton?

Kate has popularized the idea of wearing the same outfits more than once in official public appearances. It’s a nod not only to frugality but also sustainability and, well, common sense. And, it appears to be catching.

Jane Fonda also stunned in a crimson beaded Elie Saab gown — the same one she wore at Cannes in 2014 for the “Grace of Monaco” premiere.

Banks, 46, revealed on Instagram that she asked her stylists, Wendy and Nicole Ferreira, to re-work the gown she originally wore to the star-studded bash back in 2004.

The actress has jumped on the bandwagon for sustainability in fashion

“It’s gorgeous and it fits…so why not wear it again?!” she wrote on the social media site.

“Proud to wear my @badgleymischka dress that I first wore to @vanityfair #oscars party in 2004, re-imagined with @wendiandnicole, to bring global awareness to the importance of sustainability in fashion and consumerism as it relates to climate change, production & consumption, ocean pollution, labor & women.

“And thrilled to partner again with @radvocacy in support of @nsifashion2030, which helps brands draw down their carbon use and achieve measurable sustainability targets. #radvocacy #repurposed #academyawards”

The Hollywood star subsequently posted a side-by-side photograph of the dress in 2004 and in 2020.

She captioned the image: “Then (2004) and Now (2020) #recycle #radvocacy”

Meanwhile, Banks previously revealed she hoped her ‘Charlie’s Angels’ movie would convince studio bosses to back more female directors.

The filmmaker felt proud of the project, even though the movie – which starred Kristen Stewart and Naomi Scott – was panned by critics and bombed at the box office.

“The main thing I want is to convince executives that they can trust women,” she said.

“If I deliver a good movie with this amazing cast, we made something really fun that people really want to see, I just hope I can convince more executives to trust us – just trust women with the job.”

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Then (2004) and Now (2020) #recycle #radvocacy

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