Actress Demi Moore looks radiant and wrinkle-free in controversial new ads for Helena Rubinstein cosmetics. The photos are under fire for aggressive airbrushing and creating a false sense of beauty.

Britain, France and Israel are taking a tougher stand on image ads. Government agencies have gone as far as banning overly airbushed ads from being shown in public.

Experts note that Moore, 49, just doesn’t look natural.

“She looks quite unlike her usual self,” Life & Style photo editor Craig Gunn told UK’s Daily Mail. “It’s a slightly alien effect.” Indeed, she looks like a porcelain doll, or worse embalmed.

Check out Demi’s photos; click to enlarge.

Britain, France and Israel are taking a tougher stand on image ads. Government agencies have gone as far as banning overly airbushed ads from being shown in public.

“When you start taking away people’s skintones and smoothing out their features, they look like mannequins. You’re removing the human elements of the face.

Still, it’s commonplace in the beauty industry. It’s all about creating symmetry – but it’s a false beauty,” Gunn said.

Ironically, Moore has hailed for her ageless physique — the result of a strict diet and regular workouts. But since her seven-year marriage to Aston Kutcher broke up in the wake of a sex scandal, Moore’s health has been sketchy.

She was hospitalized in January following a drug-induced seizure. She is now reportedly suffering from body dysmorphia and eating disorders stemming from an obsession to remain thin and young-looking.

While airbrushing and photoshopping are common in magazines and fashion ads, the practice is coming under heavy criticism. French lawmakers recently voted in favor of a bill to ban “publicly inciting extreme thinness.” Last week, lawmakers in Israel banned “underweight” models from fashion runways, advertisements and commercials.

Several ads have been banned in the UK because of excessive photoshopping, and in one case, because a model had “highly visible ribs.”

Actress Rachael Leigh Cook, 32, told Fox News gullible fans idealize airbrushed magazine images of actresses and models, which can lead to self-esteem issues.

“Nothing that you see is real, even if you look at what looks like a candid photo of someone, anything can be done,” Cook said. “It is false advertising, and false advertising is a crime, so why isn’t this a crime?”