Actor Rob Lowe says the party started during his early days in Hollywood when he and members of the Brat Pack “competed to see who could play harder, then show up for work and still kick ass.” He’s seen his ups and downs since then, he confesses in a new autobiography.

Lowe came of age in the mid-1980s with such Hollywood stars as Charlie Sheen, Chris Penn, Emilio Estevez, Anthony Michael Hall, Andrew McCarthy, Demi Moore, Judd Nelson, Molly Ringwald, and Ally Sheedy.

Others who traveled in their orbit include cast members of “The Outsiders,” including Tom Cruise, C. Thomas Howell, Matt Dillon and Ralph Macchio.
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He described Cruise as “open, friendly, funny, and has an almost robotic, bloodless focus and an intensity that I’ve never encountered before.”

They broke out in coming of age movies “The Breakfast Club” and “St. Elmo’s Fire” and then went their separate ways. Some like Cruise reached the pinnacle of the A-List. Others, such as Rignwald, Sheedy and Hall have faded.

But Lowe and Sheen have found successful second careers in television. Lowe, who nearly destroyed his career in a sex scandal, scored success in Andrew Sorkin’s “The West Wing.”

Sheen, until recently, was the highest paid actor in television, starring in the top-rated sit-com “Two and a Half Men,” until his career imploded in a drug and alcohol fueled binges with hookers and porn stars.

Lowe recounts his exploits dating Demi Moore, Nastassja Kinski, Princess Stéphanie of Monaco and Fawn Hall of Iran-Contra infamy, who Lowe tracked down after seeing her at the Oliver North trial, according to the magazine.

In his book, Lowe writes that Sheen, the son of actor Martin Sheen, had a privileged upbringing.

He was “one-of-a-kind … a Polo preppy clotheshorse in a world of O.P. shorts and surf T-shirts” and “a wonderful mix of nerd … and rebel.”

“The cool girls in Malibu had no time for me,” Lowe says. “I wasn’t a beach volleyball player, a surfer, or a quasi-burnout.”

Within five years, however, Lowe says he and his friends were famous.

“The Brat Pack is timeless,”Lowe says. “We should all be so lucky in our lives to create things that we’re still talking about 25 years later.”

For more on his career check out Vanity Fair.